Social Justice in the Arab World since 2010: Changing Conditions, Mobilizations, and Policies

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Social Justice in the Arab World since 2010: Changing Conditions, Mobilizations, and Policies

In 2013, the Mamdouha S. Bobst Center for Peace and Justice at Princeton University and the Issam Fares Institute for Public Policy and International Affairs at the American University of Beirut (AUB) launched a four year collaborative initiative with the generous support of the Bobst Foundation in New York, focusing on projects designed to promote studies relating to the Middle East in order to advance the cause of peace, mutual understanding, and justice. This unique collaboration seeks to leverage both institutions’ intellectual capital and mutual interests in order to raise awareness about the politics of transformation in MENA. About the 2017 Conference: In this conference, we sought to assess social movement changes and emerging social justice policies, or the lack thereof, in the Arab world since 2010 - at both the national and local policy levels. We were particularly interested in examining local dynamics to learn about changes in people's everyday living conditions since 2010, how people organize and mobilize to express their grievances and seek to promote policy changes, and whether any measurable or meaningful changes in state policies related to social justice demands have occurred. The conference brought together researchers from the region and abroad who can clarify developments in areas that included the evolution of social inequalities; organized and informal social and political protest movements; citizen grievances and social justice demands; new forms of organization and activism; roles of trade unions and professional associations; reform of state institutions; decentralization and the role of local authorities; changes in people's living conditions since 2010.

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